Chimpanzees do not take into account what others can hear in a competitive situation

Juliane Braeuer*, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) know what others can and cannot see in a competitive situation. Does this reflect a general understanding the perceptions of others? In a study by Hare et al. (2000) pairs of chimpanzees competed over two pieces of food. Subordinate individuals preferred to approach food that was behind a barrier that the dominant could not see, suggesting that chimpanzees can take the visual perspective of others. We extended this paradigm to the auditory modality to investigate whether chimpanzees are sensitive to whether a competitor can hear food rewards being hidden. Results suggested that the chimpanzees did not take what the competitor had heard into account, despite being able to locate the hiding place themselves by the noise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-178
Number of pages4
JournalAnimal Cognition
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Keywords

  • social cognition
  • food competition
  • perspective taking
  • PAN-TROGLODYTES
  • CONSPECIFICS
  • INFERENCES

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