Changing narratives of race and environment in the nineteenth-century and early-twentieth-century Brazilian Amazon

Silvia Espelt-Bombin, Mark Harris

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Abstract

The Amazon has been the object of numerous reflections upon the relationship between the natural environment and the categories of human society. This article analyses Brazilian writers who considered the relations between space and race over the course of the nineteenth century and early-twentieth century. It focuses on João Henrique de Mattos, José Veríssimo and Euclides da Cunha, placing them in relation to each other and within local, national and international discourses on race, nature and development. Its aim is to examine how a racialised geographical understanding of the Amazon changed over the course of the nineteenth century and was tied to Brazilian nation-building.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-163
Number of pages14
JournalBulletin of Latin American Research
Volume38
Issue number2
Early online date22 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Amazon
  • Brazil
  • Environment
  • Identity
  • Nation-building
  • Race

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