Changing landscapes to accommodate for climate change impacts: a call for landscape ecology

Paul Opdam*, Sandra Luque, K. Bruce Jones

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

    67 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Predictions of climate change suggest major changes in temperature, rainfall as well as in frequency and timing of extreme weather, all in varying degrees and patterns around the world. Although the details of these patterns changes are still uncertain, we can be sure of profound effects on ecological processes in and functioning of landscapes. The impact of climate change will affect all types of land use, ecosystem services, as well as the behavior of humans. The core business of Landscape Ecology is the interaction of landscape patterns and processes. Most of these interactions will be affected by changing climate patterns, so clearly within the focus of our science. Nevertheless, climate change received little attention from landscape ecologists. Are we missing the boat? Why is it that our science does not contribute to building a knowledge base to help solving this immense problem? Why is there so little attention paid to adaptation of landscape to climate change? With this editorial article IALE would like to receive inputs from the Landscape Ecology scientific community in related research on adaptation of landscapes to climate change, on tools or approaches to help landscape planners and stakeholders to this new challenge where landscape ecology can play a key role.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)715-721
    Number of pages7
    JournalLandscape ecology
    Volume24
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

    Keywords

    • Climate change
    • Research challenges
    • Landscape patterns
    • Climate adaptation
    • LAND-USE
    • SPECIES DISTRIBUTIONS
    • CONSERVATION
    • BIODIVERSITY
    • FACE

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