Change and continuity after the Arab Uprising: the consequences of state formation in Arab North African states

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Abstract

This article provides a comparative macro-level overview of political development in Morocco, Tunisia and Egypt. It examines their evolution from the colonial period through several distinct phases, showing how differences in their origins were followed over time by a certain convergence towards a common post-populist form of authoritarianism, albeit still distinguished according to monarchic and republican legitimacy principles. On this basis, it assesses how past state formation trajectories made the republics more vulnerable to the Arab uprising but also what differences they make for the prospects of post-uprising democratisation. While in Morocco the monarch's legitimacy allows it to continue divide-and-rule politics, in Egypt the army's historic central role in politics has been restored, while in Tunisia the trade union movement has facilitated a greater democratic transition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-30
JournalBritish Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
Volume42
Issue number1
Early online date12 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Arab Uprising
  • Egypt
  • Tunisia
  • Morocco
  • state formation

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