Benzothiazolyl ureas are low micromolar and uncompetitive inhibitors of 17β-HSD10 with implications to Alzheimer’s disease treatment

Monika Schmidt, Ondrej Benek, Lucie Vinklarova, Martina Hrabinova, Lucie Zemanova, Matej Chribek, Vendula Kralova, Lukas Hroch, Rafael Dolezal, Antonin Lycka, Lukas Prchal, Daniel Jun, Laura Aitken, Frank Gunn-Moore, Kamil Kuca, Kamil Musilek

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15 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 is a multifunctional protein involved in many enzymatic and structural processes within mitochondria. This enzyme was suggested to be involved in several neurological diseases, e.g., mental retardation, Parkinson’s disease, or Alzheimer’s disease, in which it was shown to interact with the amyloid-beta peptide. We prepared approximately 60 new compounds based on a benzothiazolyl scaffold and evaluated their inhibitory ability and mechanism of action. The most potent inhibitors contained 3-chloro and 4-hydroxy substitution on the phenyl ring moiety, a small substituent at position 6 on the benzothiazole moiety, and the two moieties were connected via a urea linker (4at, 4bb, and 4bg). These compounds exhibited IC50 values of 1–2 μM and showed an uncompetitive mechanism of action with respect to the substrate, acetoacetyl-CoA. These uncompetitive benzothiazolyl inhibitors of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 are promising compounds for potential drugs for neurodegenerative diseases that warrant further research and development.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2059
Number of pages26
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Neurodegeneration
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10
  • ABAD
  • Inhibitor
  • Benzothiazole

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