Average frequencies of digits in infinite IFS’s and applications to continued fractions and Lüroth expansions

Lars Olsen, M. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The detailed investigation of the distribution of frequencies of digits of points belonging to attractors K of Infinite iterated functions systems (IIFS’s) is a fundamental and important problem in the study of attractors of IIFS’s. This paper studies the Baire category of different families of sets of points belonging to attractors of IIFS’s characterised by the behaviour of the frequencies of their digits. All our results are of the following form:

a typical (in the sense of Baire) point x ∈ K has the following property: the average frequencies of digits of x have maximal oscillation.

We consider general types of average frequencies, namely, average frequencies associated with general averaging systems. These averages include, for example, all higher order Hölder and Cesaro averages, and Riesz averages. Surprising, for all averaging systems (regardless of how powerful they are) we prove that a typical (in the sense of Baire) point x∈K

has the following property: the average frequencies of digits of x have maximal oscillation. This substantially extends previous results and provides a powerful topological manifestation of the fact that “points of divergence” are highly visible. Several applications are given, e.g. to continued fraction digits and Lüroth expansion digits.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages38
JournalMonatshefte für Mathematik
VolumeFirst Online
Early online date12 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Baire category
  • Non-normal numbers
  • Average systems
  • Infinite iterated function systems
  • Continued fraction expansion
  • Lüroth expansion
  • Hausdorff dimension
  • Packing dimension

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Average frequencies of digits in infinite IFS’s and applications to continued fractions and Lüroth expansions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this