Automatic face recognition for film character retrieval in feature-length films

Oggie Arandelovic*, Andrew Zisserman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this work is to recognize all the frontal faces of a character in the closed world of a movie or situation comedy, given a small number of query faces. This is challenging because faces in a feature-length film are relatively uncontrolled with a wide variability of scale, pose, illumination, and expressions, and also may be partially occluded. We develop a recognition method based on a cascade of processing steps that normalize for the effects of the changing imaging environment. In particular there are three areas of novelty: (i) we suppress the background surrounding the face, enabling the maximum area of the face to be retained for recognition rather than a subset; (ii) we include a pose refinement step to optimize the registration between the test image and face exemplar; and (iii) we use robust distance to a sub-space to allow for partial occlusion and expression change. The method is applied and evaluated on several feature length films. It is demonstrated that high recall rates (over 92%) can be achieved whilst maintaining good precision (over 93%).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2005 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2005
Pages860-867
Number of pages8
VolumeI
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event2005 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2005 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 20 Jun 200525 Jun 2005

Conference

Conference2005 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period20/06/0525/06/05

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