Assessing with CARE: An innovative method of testing the approach and casualty assessment components of basic life support, using video recording

CA Lester, CL Morgan, Peter Duncan Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The resuscitation community is now moving towards a set of basic life support guidelines but different countries and training centres have their own individual methods of instruction. It would be advantageous if a universal testing method were available to facilitate intercentre comparison. This could lead to an international course which had been rigorously assessed and evaluated. Taking this as a starting point, the Cardiff Assessment of Response and Evaluation (CARE) was developed. CARE is an innovative assessment technique using video recording for testing the preliminary steps of life support as outlined by the European Resuscitation Council. The assessment was validated by testing 67 members of the public who had been trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 27 shortly after instruction and 40 between 6 and 18 months after instruction. All subjects were tested without prior warning and video recorded for independent scoring by two researchers and a paramedic training officer. Scores were compared using the ic correlation which showed a high level of agreement between observers. Video recording and marking using the CARE schedule and guidelines is a reliable method for assessing the preliminary steps in life support. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume34
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1997

Keywords

  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • skill retention
  • testing
  • video recording
  • BYSTANDER CARDIOPULMONARY-RESUSCITATION
  • HOSPITAL CARDIAC-ARREST
  • CPR SKILLS
  • RETENTION
  • SURVIVAL
  • COMMUNITY
  • QUALITY

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