Armaments after autonomy: military adaptation and the drive for domestic defence industries

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Abstract

State investments in domestic defence industries are one of the most puzzling trends in international relations. Economists contend that these investments waste resources, while political scientists claim that armaments’ resultant overproduction fuels arms races. Why then do governments cultivate defence industries? I draw on cases from Israel, South Africa and Iraq to argue that the answers to these questions are distinct. Fears about supply security frequently spur states to begin developing arms industries, and elites’ techno-nationalist beliefs often sustain their defence-industrial investments. Defence industries’ primary national security value, however, lies in their hitherto unappreciated contribution to states’ military adaptation capacity.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages35
JournalJournal of Strategic Studies
VolumeLatest Articles
Early online date30 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 May 2019

Keywords

  • Military adaptation
  • Defence industry
  • Armaments
  • Security of supply
  • Israel

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